Displaying 1 - 10 of 58

Marine Mammal Admits

The Marine Mammal Center
MOU image

An educator might use this resource to:

examine data on marine mammal (seal and sea lion primarily) strandings along 600 miles of California coast from 1975-2016, thinking of this as an indirect measure of changing ocean conditions. This can be used to extrapolate how various changes in the ocean environment (i.e. periods of warm water temperatures, sea level rise) can impact marine mammal health.

Resource type: Data visualization

NOWData - NOAA Online Weather Data

NOAA: National Weather Forecast Service Office

An educator might use this resource to:

search for local climatological data and graphs as well as observed weather reports, including information on temperature and precipitation.

Resource type: Data

Production-Based Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory

Bay Area Air Quality Management District

An educator might use this resource to:

to access the latest information and findings from the Bay Area Air Quality Management District’s production-based inventory of greenhouse gas emissions for the region.

Resource type: Research papers and reports

Our Coast Our Future Interactive Map

Point Blue Conservation Science, USGS, USC, and many other partners

An educator might use this resource to:

have their audiences practice assessing sea level rise and extreme weather event impacts on local coastal areas and think about how that affects infrastructure planning. Learners can ask questions from there like, "would a sea wall or a tidal marsh restoration be a solution to climate impacts?" This collaborative, user-driven tool has flood predication maps, case studies, and other resources for planning for sea level rise and extreme storm events along the California coast.

Resource type: Data visualization

California King Tides Photo Initiative

California King Tides Project

An educator might use this resource to:

view and use photos of the King Tides across CA, including the Bay Area. This is useful for showing local impacts of sea level rise, as the King Tides are a good indicator of what our oceans might look like under different climate change scenarios. Educators might also want to get their students involved in this or similar citizen science projects.

Resource type: Multimedia

Climate Change Impacts: Gulf of the Farallones and Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuaries

Farallones and Cordell Bank marine sanctuaries

An educator might use this resource to:

see what potential climate change impacts may affect habitats and biological communities along the north-central California coast.

Resource type: Research papers and reports

Future San Francisco Bay Tidal Marshes a Climate–Smart Planning Tool

Point Blue Conservation Science

An educator might use this resource to:

manipulate data in order to model different scenarios in which marshes in the San Francisco Bay Estuary respond to seal level rise. This tool can help shed light on how sea level rise may change the extent of tidal marsh habitat and bird species distribution over the next 100 years, identifying both vulnerable and resilient areas.

Resource type: Data visualization

How Many San Francisco Bays?

The Bay Institute

An educator might use this resource to:

get a brief background on how natural global warming periods created the San Francisco Bay as well as what role human-caused global warming has had and will continue to have.

Resource type: Other

Climate Change & Bay Area Human Health Facts, Figures and Science-Based Storyline

Climate Readiness Institute

An educator might use this resource to:

better link climate change effects with human health repercussions in the Bay Area.

Resource type: Research papers and reports

The State of the Birds San Francisco Bay 2011

Point Blue Conservation Science and the San Francisco Bay Joint Venture

An educator might use this resource to:

learn and teach about climate change effects and solution-oriented actions for key San Francisco Bay species and habitats.This first-ever State of the Birds Report for San Francisco Bay summarizes the current state of knowledge on the Bay’s bird populations and details the actions needed to keep birds and their habitats thriving as sea levels rise and extreme storm events increase due to global climate change.

Resource type: Research papers and reports